A Beauty & Lifestyle Blog

Monday, November 11, 2019

Getting Over Your Fear of the Dentist

Around 75% of us are scared of the dentist. For some people, it’s a minor fear. They worry a little before appointments, but they still go, and wouldn’t ever put up with toothache to avoid seeing their dentist. But, for other people, it is much worse. They can’t go to the dentist. Even the idea of booking an appointment raises their blood pressure. They struggle to sleep; they panic and face severe anxiety. They’d rather have a mild toothache than see their dentist.

For many people, this kind of anxiety is a result of a bad experience, and for others, it’s a learned behavior. Perhaps their own parents were scared of the dentist, or never went when they were kids, and the fear has been contagious. Some people are just scared, without any logical reason.

But visiting the dentist is important. Your dentist can prevent pain and improve your smile. They might even spot signs of other health conditions before anyone else does, and usually, it only takes around ten minutes of your day. Here is a look at some of the things that you can do to beat your fear of the dentist.


Find the Right Dentist
It’s essential that you take time finding the right dentist for you. Think about what you want from the dentist, whether it’s cosmetic work, or just checkups and general TLC. Then, look online for a dentist in your local area and book some appointments. Explain that you are scared and looking for the right person. Treat that first visit as an interview. If you don’t like them, or they don’t make you feel safe, look elsewhere. Most dentists are used to frightened patients and will be happy to put your mind at ease.

Wear Headphones
Many people aren’t scared of the dentist, or even the idea of pain. They hate the sounds. The sound of a dentist's drill and other equipment makes them feel anxious, and even if their mouth has been numbed, the sounds make them uncomfortable. Ask your dentist if you can listen to music with headphones, to avoid the sounds. Your dentist can tap your shoulder if they need to speak to you, and wireless headphones can eliminate the risk of wires getting in their way. You might also want to close your eyes.

Ask Questions
Most of us are scared of the unknown. You might be worried about what the dentist will do and what it will feel like. Before any treatment, ask your dentist to explain in detail what they are going to be doing, and ask questions.

Ask Your Friends and Family for Recommendations
If you are scared of your dentist, because you’ve had a negative experience, don’t stick with them. Ask people you know about their dentists, to find someone who might make you feel more comfortable.

Take Your Kids


As soon as your children have teeth, they should visit the dentist at least twice a year. Book family appointments so that you can all go in together. You’ll want to set a good example for your kids, and will put on a brave face to make them feel more at ease.
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