Carat, Quality and What You Need To Know: The Diamond Engagement Ring

Monday, September 7, 2015

If you're in the position to drop some serious coin on a diamond engagement ring, then you at least have - however vague - a general idea about the world's most beautiful gemstone: the diamond. Don't be influenced by anyone who uses verbiage "only" when referring to diamond engagment rings, because a qualified jeweller will tell you there are many kinds of rings as your option. In today's diamond engagement ring market, you'll get to examine any carat (size) of diamonds. Size is important in diamonds - it definitely contributes to the price, but other factors weigh heavily, like quality of the stone, the number of inclusions (internal flaws) and blemishes (external flaws), the cut of the diamond as well as the type of metal you choose for the ring.
Seek an Expert’s Advice
No matter how much research you’ve poured into, online and in books and magazines, no matter how many friends you’ve consulted (“But they went through it, they bought diamond engagement rings, you declare), no one will be able to truly offer you advice and sound explanations: except for an expert. And the way to find an expert is to shop at a reputable dealer. Look for certified diamond engagement rings by Serendipity Diamonds, which has a wide array of choices, including 14 types of solitaire diamond rings (including Canada Mark diamond engagement rings). Serendipity’s British-made jewellery is shipped to the U.S. in three to four weeks. The website also offers easy-to-search categories. In addition to the aforementioned solitaires, you can view by the number of diamonds in the ring and many different styles, including vintage, Halo, cluster and pink sapphire and diamond.
Round and Round
Of the many types of diamond cut, the most popular – by some 75% -- is the round diamond. By the nature of the circle-shape, the round diamond offers incredible light-reflection, for stunning, maximum brightness. Nearly all round diamonds are considered “brilliant-cut,” which is designated by the 58 facets (or 57 when there’s not a culet, the flat face on the bottom of the gem; it’s from the Latin, culus).The high demand for round diamonds means that they cost more than other shapes. 

When a craftsman begins with a rough diamond, more of the stone is lost when it is cut into a round shape. Each carat kept from the original rough stone can cost 25% to 35% more than other cut of diamond shapes. Round diamonds actually have a “cut guide” which includes the assessments for:

• Excellent
• Very Good
• Good Fair
• Poor

Breaking down
• Table percentage
• Depth percentage
• Crown Angle
• Pavillion Depth
• Girdle
• Culet
• L/W Ration

As well as a “colour guide” (interestingly, the colour preference of round diamonds is entirely on the consumer):

• <.50 ct.
• .51-1.0 ct.
• 1.0-2.0 ct.
• >2.0 carat
Comparing 2- to 3-carat round diamonds
A two-carat round diamond ring is 8.1 mm and a three-carat round diamond is s 9.3 mm. You can’t just ask for 2 and carat round diamonds compared as there are too many variables. A two- carat diamond is the equivalent of 200 milligrams and a three-carat is 300 milligrams. The word carat comes from the carob bean because the bean is uniform in weight. And weight is the easy way to understand a diamond’s value. Diamonds are actually priced per carat, which, of course, can really vary based on the quality of the diamond (and how many inclusions and blemishes it has). 

You can calculate its price by comparing it to similar diamonds. For example, divide the selling price by the exact carat weight to determine the “per carat” cost of like gemstones. However – and critically -- there is not a standard price for a carat of diamond, which is then subsequently doubled when a diamond is two carats. The price of a diamond rises exponentially because the larger the diamond, the more rare it is. For example, one in one million diamonds are quality one-carat stones, but one in 15 million are two-carat diamonds, which cost between £3,260 and £32,000 on average. Three-carat diamonds range from less than £6,440 for the lowest quality to six-figures or more for the best quality. 

Now, armed with this information, you’re ready to take the next step.

This article is contributed by Mediabuzzer.

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Kizzy Von Doll said...

I've never really been a diamond girl, unless it's a pink diamond, I like sapphires, but knowing what to look for is very helpful because I've seen a few people get swindled out of real diamonds and things before. Super post doll xx

Nerline Germain said...

Good morning, Kim!! I love the details in this article. Very informative. Thanks for sharing your thoughts with us.

Rakhshanda Rizvi said...

I love diamonds, love the details you have been given in this article Kim. Very helpful <3 Kisses <3
http://www.rakhshanda-chamberofbeauty.com/

Jackie Harrison said...

I learn so much about diamond quality with this post is informative and very helpful thanks.

Lilli said...

Love diamonds, won't mind to get a huge one but Im not that expert in this object!:P Even though you know I prefer ruby rings. Kisses Kim! xo

Clare said...

this is such a useful post! diamonds are so pretty :)

http://claresloves.blogspot.com/

Naeun Kim said...

Very interesting article! I don't know too much about diamonds but I'm sure when the day comes when I'm looking for one, this post will come in handy :) xx

www.tongue-in-chic.com

Ashley said...

Great information Kim! It's very intetesting and I didn't know a lot of it!

Artdicted 2 said...

I'll definitely save this post & read it before my wedding (;
Nati xx
www.simplyartdicted.com

Miss Val's Creations said...

Very informative! Shopping for a diamond has so many factors involved besides overall looks.

Miss Val's Creations said...

Very informative! Shopping for a diamond has so many factors involved besides overall looks.

Maria Cartagena said...

Great information for diamond shopping. :)

xo

Maria
www.onestyleatatime.com

Candice Petersen said...

Ths is really interesting!



Candice Beauty Candy Loves

La Joie de Vivre! said...

oh wow, this is such an interesting post!! thanks for the useful tips :D xoxo

Beauty Unearthly said...

Lovely post, have a beautiful week! <3

Rowena @ rolala loves said...

I remember doing all this research when we bought my engagement ring. I actually got to choose my own diamond :)

Rowena @ rolala loves

Pilar said...

This is a very informative post about Diamonds! Thanks for sharing Kim and Happy Labor Day!

Gabrielle said...

A very interesting and informative piece, Kim! I've always found it interesting that the larger the diamond, the rarer it is.. though I have to admit to preferring tiny, dainty jewellery/diamonds haha! :)

Gabrielle | A Glass Of Ice
x

JOURNAL OF STYLE said...

I remember dreaming of a big diamond ring like J.Lo got from Ben Affleck. But when the hubby and me were searching for a ring, I liked the subtle, delicate version even more. Great information, Kim! I didn't know anything about diamonds before. <3

xoxo Ira
JOURNAL OF STYLE / BLOGLOVIN

Ivana Split said...

very informative post. I must admit I didn't know any of these. It is not common in my culture for people to buy diamont engagement rings, even the ones who have the money do to it, don't buy them. I supposed diamonts are just not as popular here as in some other places. I doubt I will ever be able to affort a diamond ring, but still good to know.

Ivana Split said...

very informative post. I must admit I didn't know any of these. It is not common in my culture for people to buy diamont engagement rings, even the ones who have the money do to it, don't buy them. I supposed diamonts are just not as popular here as in some other places. I doubt I will ever be able to affort a diamond ring, but still good to know.

Rebeca Muñoz López said...

Very interesting post, I do know much about diamonds, Thanks for share this info Kim!

www.urbanikamoda.blogspot.com

oomph. said...

great information here! thank you for sharing this!

Jacinth III Suico said...

Wow .. Very Knowledgeable . I never had known this before ...

Jace | www.laagpamore.net