How To Beat Your PB And Improve Your Running Time

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Sometimes you get caught in a rut, and it can feel like you’re never going to smash that magic personal best on your 5K or half-marathon. Some people like to run at a certain pace and don’t feel the need to improve, and that’s totally OK! For plenty others, though, seeing those lap times remain static, even if you managed a full run, can feel like a defeat. If you’ve been punching the same numbers for a few weeks now, then it’s definitely time to mix things up. Here are a few tips to beat the running blues this summer.


1. Add in a long run

If you’re running the same distance every day, then it’s easy to fall into a routine. Your body will settle into it, and you’ll soon find yourself sticking to the same running pace if you’re not constantly pushing yourself all the time. A longer run once a week might be the shake-up your body and mind needs. If you’re running 5km every day, try for 7km. Running 10km? Try for 12km.  It doesn’t have to be much, and when you do run these longer distances, maintain a pace that’s comfortable for you – you should still be able to hold a brisk conversation and breathe without too much effort.

2. Check your shoe fit

Many people slow or shorten their runs because of sore feet. While blisters and bunions are a part of long-distance running to some extent, you shouldn’t be limping after half an hour. If you find you’re in a lot of pain and it’s not improving, don’t wait for your feet to ‘toughen up.’ Chances are your shoes might not be quite right for you. Those who have wide or flat feet will find straight shoe sizes very uncomfortable, so look at stores that specialise in wide fit shoes, like Wide Fit Shoes, with an exclusive New Balance trainers line, for a pair of runners that will fit you like a glove.

3. Build up your leg muscles

Ever find that when you’re running, it’s the legs that give out before your lungs? If so, then you need to balance your body’s endurance capabilities by building your leg muscles. You don’t have to spend hours in the gym slurping down protein shakes – just do some simple bodyweight strength exercises, such as squats, lunges, planks, or wall-sits. It will only take a few minutes a day, and it’s something you can do while watching TV or waiting for dinner to cook. Just make sure that if you’re doing them before your run, give your legs time to recover!

4. Add in some sprints

It’s nice to be finally settled into a running groove, but you’ll only maintain your current fitness if you’re not pushing yourself hard. Include short bursts between 30 and 60 seconds in your run where you’re pushing your body as hard as you can. This will boost your cardiovascular system, which will help build muscle tone, coordination, and even blood sugar levels. Don’t overdo it, particularly on your first try – remember, there’s still the rest of your run to go!

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Miss Val's Creations said...

Great tips Kim! I used to run when I was younger but my knees started feeling it at some point. It was always therapeutic for my mind. Now it is all about yoga for me. :)

Pamela RG said...

These are wonderful tips Kim. Exerting the extra effort is always beneficial.

Candice Petersen said...

Thanks for these tips Kim, I actually not a runner but would like to change that I have a major chest problem and just can't breath when I run.

Beauty Candy Loves
 

Laura - Alagoz said...

I'm so bad at running! I have the hardest time to push myself to go out and run and I never last long :(

Laura
Pink Frenzy

Diva Desle said...

I'm not the best runner. I actually suck at it, LOL. I do it any way to improve my stamina and keep fit. I like to run at my own pace and will never take part in marathons. I broke my ankle when I was six years old, so protecting my joints are very important. I agree that we should invest in well fitted and good quality running shoes. Excellent post! Xxx